jill-dyche

Hi.

Writer, classic rock lover, dog rescuer, company founder, software exec, and now independent management consultant--I speak, blog, and pester my friends about these topics. My current focus is getting IT and business organizations to collaborate more effectively and not kill each other. I also talk and write about big data, why analytics is fundamentally strategic, how to pitch business execs on IT projects, and why not to buy a dog from a pet store.

I’ve lived in London, Paris, and Sydney, but call L.A. home. #weatherwimp. I cultivate an organic vegetable garden and friends with issues. I’ve written three books, co-authored a fourth, and contributed to a bunch more. (I have another one in my head waiting to come out, but it’s crowded in there right now.) I prefer Def Leppard to Bon Jovi, mashed potatoes to brown rice, fly fishing to golf, Pinot Noir to Zinfandel, and nice people to assholes. I have a tattoo. I’m not telling you where. I feel guilty that I go hot and cold on social media, that I don’t spend enough face time with my friends, that my French is rusty, and that I ate that whole bag of Kirkland peanut butter cups in less than a week. I have to live with those things.

What Makes a Leader a Change Agent?

In both her research for her latest book, The New IT, and in her career as a consultant and executive advisor, Jill has learned that leaders who drive change think differently. They view themselves as custodians of corporate direction, linking their visions of the future to execution tactics that can help get their companies where they need to be—sometimes staring down the sacred cows of culture and habit in the process.

In this video, Jill discusses how leaders in both business and IT are re-crafting rules of engagement between business and IT, inviting new collaboration frameworks, and supporting innovation and digital strategies in the process.

There's No "I" in "Archetype"

There's No "I" in "Archetype"

Sometimes It IS Brain Surgery: the CIO as Change Agent

Sometimes It IS Brain Surgery: the CIO as Change Agent